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Biography of Prophet Muhammad (1/3)

Biography of Prophet Muhammad (1/3)

Biography of Prophet Muhammad (1/3)

He is Muhammad son of Abdullah. He was chosen by Allah as the final Prophet sent to mankind. Allah chose him to be the representative and living example of the final revelation.

He is Muhammad son of Abdullah. He was chosen by Allah as the final Prophet sent to mankind. Allah chose him to be the representative and living example of the final revelation. We all should love and respect him. The Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) is not considered to be divine but he, as all other Prophets, is a human being. However, he is seen as the most perfect of human beings, shining like a diamond amongst coal.

Birth and Prophethood

He was born in Makkah in 570, in the tribe of Quraish, one of the greatest tribes in Arabia that assumed leadership of Makkah. His father `Abdullah died when he was still in his mother’s womb. His mother Aminah died when he was 6 years old. He was then raised as an orphan by his grandfather `Abdul-Muttalib and later by his uncle Abu Talib. The young Muhammad displayed exceptional virtues as a respected truthful young man whom members of various tribes would invite to act as arbitrator in their disputes. He was actually nicknamed years before his Prophethood as “Al-Amin” which means the honest and trustworthy.

Allah, the Almighty, protected him from the evils of the Arab way of life such as drinking alcohol, fornication, theft, murder and so on. He worked as a shepherd with his family in his early years. When he (peace be upon him) reached 25 years, he worked as a merchant for a very special woman named Khadijah. She had been married and widowed twice and she was known for her noble characteristics, such as intelligence, good character, beauty and wealth from her business. She was 40 years old and found an attraction to the honesty and sincerity in the character of Muhammad (peace be upon him). She sent someone to talk to him concerning the subject of marriage. He accepted and they were shortly thereafter married. Khadijah was the first wife of the Prophet (peace be upon him) from whom all his daughters were born. They were married for 24 years until she passed at age 64.

Back in those days, the Arabs practiced many forms of idolatry, each tribe keeping its own idols at the Ka`bah. Sadly, the monotheistic message of Abraham had long become corrupted and forgotten among the general population of the Arabian Peninsula. The Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him), however, was a believer in One God, and all of his life he never participated in the idolatrous practices of his people. He became bothered with the lifestyle of Makkah; its idol worshipping, superstitions and indulging in worldly lusts and pleasures. Because of this uneasiness, he made a habit of going into seclusion in the nearby mountains of Makkah fasting and praying to the Almighty God and seeking peace of mind. While going on these seclusions, the trees and rocks would say “Peace be upon you”. Startled he would turn and find nothing but rocks and trees.

The First Revelation

When he reached forty years old, during one of the retreats of spiritual seclusion in the month of Ramadan, Muhammad (peace be upon him) first saw the Angel Gabriel who revealed to him the first portion of Allah’s Word to him. He told him what is translated “Read” or “Recite”, but Muhammad replied to the same request three times “I can’t read”. Then, Gabriel revealed to him the first five verses of the Qur’an and told him that he is the final Messenger of Allah to the whole of mankind.

Read in the name of your Lord, who created (everything). He creates the human being from a small lump of cells clinging to the womb. Read and your Lord is the Most Generous. He is the one who taught man to use the pen. He taught man that which he did not know. (Al-`Alaq 96:1-5)

After receiving this startling revelation, anyone would be confused and concerned. The Prophet (peace be upon him) went to his wife shaking from awe. She wrapped him in a blanket and he informed her of the extraordinary events which had taken place. She knew very well about the Prophet’s (peace be upon him) outstanding morals and character as well as his honesty and trustworthiness. She immediately proclaimed her faith to him saying: “Never would Allah allow you to be affected by any evil! Truly you are dutiful to your family, you are concerned with helping others, you give to the needy, you are most hospitable to your guests, and you are known for speaking the truth and supporting others when they speak the truth”. (Al-Bukhari)

She was the first person to believe in the Prophethood of Muhammad (peace be upon him). She had a cousin who was a Christian and had knowledge of Angels and revelation. So, they left to ask her Christian cousin Waraqah ibn Nawfal about this extraordinary occurrence. They told Waraqah what happened and he replied: “Indeed you are the final Prophet (peace be upon him) sent to mankind. Truly, it was the Angel Gabriel who has come to you. Be sure that your people will deny you, attack you, expel you from Makkah and try to kill you.” (Al-Bukhari)

The Prophet (peace be upon him) was amazed at these statements because he was from the highly respected tribe of `Abdul-Muttalib, which was well-known among the Arabs. Waraqah assured him about these realities. “No Prophet was sent with a message except the people gathered to fight him. And if I live to see that day, I will fight them with you.” (Muslim)

 

Read also:

Biography of the Prophet Muhammad (2/3)

Biography of the Prophet Muhammad (3/3)

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What Did They Say about the Prophet Muhammad?

What Did They Say about the Prophet Muhammad?

 

What Did They Say about the Prophet Muhammad?

It is impossible for anyone who studies the life and character of the great Prophet of Arabia to feel anything but reverence for the mighty Prophet. Annie Besant

Dr. Abudrrahman Al-Sheha quoted in his book some impartial statements about the Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him). They are as follows:

1. The German Poet, Wolfgang Göthe1 said, “I looked into history for a human paradigm and found it to be in Muhammad.

2. Professor Keith Moore2 in his book “The Developing Human”, “It is clear to me that these statements must have come to Muhammad from God, or Allah, because most of this knowledge was not discovered until many centuries later. This proves to me that Muhammad must have been a messenger of God, or Allah.”

He further said, “I have no difficulty in my mind reconciling that this is a divine inspiration or revelation, which lead him to these statements.”

3. Dr. Maurice Bucaille3 said in his book “The Qur’an, the Bible and Modern Science”, “A totally objective examination of it [the Qur’an] in the light of modern knowledge, leads us to recognize the agreement between the two, as has been already noted on repeated occasions. It makes us deem it quite unthinkable for a man of Muhammad’s time to have been the author of such statements, on account of the state of knowledge in his day. Such considerations are part of what gives the Qur’anic Revelation its unique place, and forces the impartial scientist to admit his inability to provide an explanation which calls solely upon materialistic reasoning.”

4. Annie Besant,4 said in the book “The Life and Teachings of Mohammad”, “It is impossible for anyone who studies the life and character of the great Prophet of Arabia, who knew how he taught and how he lived, to feel anything but reverence for the mighty Prophet, one of the great messengers of the Supreme. And although in what I put to you I shall say many things which may be familiar to many, yet I myself feel, whenever I reread them, a new way of admiration, a new sense of reverence for that mighty Arabian teacher.“

5. Dr. Gustav Weil in History of the Islamic Peoples said, “Muhammad was a shining example to his people. His character was pure and stainless. His house, his dress, his food–they were characterized by a rare simplicity. So unpretentious was he that he would receive from his companions no special mark of reverence, nor would he accept any service from his slave which he could do for himself. He was accessible to all at all times. He visited the sick and was full of sympathy for all. Unlimited was his benevolence and generosity as also was his anxious care for the welfare of the community.”([5])

6. Maurice Gaudefroy said: “Muhammad was a prophet, not a theologian, a fact so evident that one is loath to state it. The men who surrounded him and constituted the influential elite of the primate Muslim community, contented themselves with obeying the law that he had proclaimed in the name of Allah and with following his teaching and example.” ([6])

7. Washington Irving([7]), said: “His military triumphs awakened no pride nor vain glory as they would have done had they been effected by selfish purposes. In the time of his greatest power he maintained the same simplicity of manner and appearance as in the days of his adversity. So far from affecting regal state, he was displeased if, on entering a room, any unusual testimonial of respect was shown to him.” ([8])

 

Footnotes:

[1] German writer and scientist, a master of poetry, drama, and the novel. He also conducted scientific research in various fields, notably botany, and held several governmental positions.

[2] He was the former President of the Canadian Association of Anatomists, Department of anatomy and cell biology, University of Toronto.

[3] Dr. Maurice Bucaille was an eminent French surgeon, scientist, scholar and author of ‘‘The Bible, The Qur’an and Science.’

[4] English theosophist, philosopher, and political figure who advocated home rule and educational reforms in India.

[5] Encyclopedia of Seerah, by Afzalur‐Rahman.

[6] Ibid.

[7] He was a famous writer. He died in 1859.

[8] Encyclopedia of Seerah, by Afzalur‐Rahman.

 

_______________________

Source: Taken from the book entitled “Muhammad, the Messenger of Allah” by Abdurrahman Al-Sheha

 


 

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Heraclius and Prophet Muhammad

Heraclius and Prophet Muhammad

 

Heraclius and Prophet Muhammad 1

If I were to go there, I would embrace Islam and wash the Prophet’s feet with my own hands.” Hercules said.

Arabia, during the time of the noble Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) was a country without any central authority. It was a country far from the civilized nations of those days.

At the time Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) was spreading Islam; asking people to turn away from worshiping idols to worshiping Allah, the Almighty, the All Knower, the Master. The Prophet (peace be upon him) sent letters of invitation to kings and rulers of various countries in the world, inviting them to embrace Islam. Many of the letters were met with a favorable response whilst others were rejected. In many cases, the messengers of the Prophet (peace be upon him) were badly treated and abused.

But the Prophet was not worried by these setbacks. He was inviting people to the right path and a few setbacks could not deter him from propagating Islam.

Abu Sufyan a leader of the tribe of Quraysh and the arch enemy of the Prophet (peace be upon him) was in Constantinople on a business trip, when the Prophet’s letter of invitation reached Heraclius, the Byzantine emperor of Eastern Roman Empire.

Heraclius, at the time was in his court at Constantinople celebrating his victory over the Persians. Heraclius read the letter through an interpreter and then asked the people in his court, to find out if there was someone in the city, who knew the Prophet (peace be upon him).

Abu Sufyan with his companions were brought into the court. The emperor asked Abu Sufyan, “What kind of family does Muhammad belong to?”

“Noble”, replied Abu Sufyan.

“Has there been a king in his family?” Heraclius asked.

“No,” said Abu Sufyan.

“Are the people who have accepted his religion poor or rich?” Heraclius questioned again.

“They are poor”, replied Abu Sufyan.

Heraclius was now becoming more and more interested and he went on asking questions.

His next question was, “Are his followers on the increase or decrease?”

“Increasing”, Abu Sufyan replied shortly.

“Have you known him to tell lies”? asked Heraclius.

“No”, admitted Abu Sufyan.

“Does he ever go against his convents?” Heraclius once again asked.

“Not so far. But we have to see whether he carries out the new agreement made between us and him”, Abu Sufyan answered lengthily for a change.

“Have you ever fought him in wars?” Heraclius questioned.

”Yes”, answered Abu Sufyan.

“What has been the result?” Heraclius asked, getting more and more interested.

“Sometimes we have won, sometimes he”, replied Abu Sufyan.

“What does he teach?” asked Heraclius.

“Worship One God, join no partners with Him, carry out your prayers, be chaste, speak the truth and keep union with your relatives”, answered Abu Sufyan, even surprised at his own answer as it sounded like he was preaching Islam.

Heraclius stood up and said, “If all you said is true, then I am sure that this Prophet’s Kingdom will reach here where I am standing. I was certain that a Prophet was coming, but I didn’t know that he would be born in Arabia. If I were to go there, I would embrace Islam and wash the Prophet’s feet with my own hands.”

This was the way in which the Prophet (peace be upon him) spread Islam. He impressed them by his truthfulness, honesty, noble character and dedication in the service of Allah. He did not compel people to accept Islam under threat of waging wars, nor did he compel people to accept Islam by the force of the sword. He fought only in defense, and only when the enemies waged war on him.

___________________

Source: Taken from the book “A Message to Those Who Do Not Believe in Prophet Muhammad” by www.rasoulallah.net Team

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Statements of Western Historians about Muhammad

Statements of Western Historians about Muhammad

Prophet Muhammad

“Muhammad was the soul of kindness, and his influence was felt and never forgotten by those around him,” Diwan Chand Sharma

The claim that Muhammad (peace be upon him) wrote the Qur’an is not new. His own people made this claim. In response, to this claim, God revealed the following:

Say, [O Muhammad], “It is not for me to change it on my own accord. I only follow what is revealed to me. Indeed I fear, if I should disobey my Lord, the punishment of a tremendous Day.” Say, “If Allah had willed, I would not have recited it to you, nor would He have made it known to you, for I had remained among you a lifetime before it. Then will you not reason?” (Yunus 10:15-16)

This verse is telling his critics to reflect on the fact that Muhammad (Peace be upon him) lived amongst them from forty (40) years before reciting the Qur’an to them while never showing any signs of inclination to poetry and themselves knowing that he was illiterate. If he could not read or write, then where did these magnificent verses come from?

Also reflect on the fact that Muhammad (peace be upon him) is commanded in the verses above to “Say” twice. This is a command to make a certain statement to the people. One can find this command “Say” 332 times throughout the Qur’an. In other places in the Qur’an, he (peace be upon him) is ordered to “proclaim”, “Glorify Your Lord”, “Prostrate Yourself” etc. So we ask is this how a man talks to himself or writes a book?

Also one must consider the fact that even before his Prophethood, Muhammad (Peace be upon him) was known amongst his people as “Al-Amin”, the trustworthy and the truthful. No one ever recorded a lie against him.

Many Western historians agree with this analysis:

– “If a man like Muhammad were to assume the dictatorship of the modern world, he would succeed in solving its problems that would bring it the much needed peace and happiness.” George Bernard Shaw
– “My choice of Muhammad to lead the list of the world’s most influential persons may surprise some readers and may be questioned by others, but he was the only man in history who was supremely successful on both the religious and secular level.” Michael H. Hart, in his book “The 100: A Ranking of the Most Influential Persons In History”
– “Muhammad was the soul of kindness, and his influence was felt and never forgotten by those around him,” Diwan Chand Sharma, in the book “The Prophets of the East”
– “He was Caesar and Pope in one; but he was Pope without Pope’s pretensions, Caesar without the legions of Caesar: without a standing army, without a bodyguard, without a palace, without a fixed revenue; if ever any man had the right to say that he ruled by the right divine, it was Mohammed, for he had all the power without its instruments and without its supports.” Bosworth Smith, in the book “Mohammad and Mohammadanism”
– “Philosopher, orator, apostle, legislator, warrior, conqueror of ideas, restorer of rational dogmas, of a cult without images; the founder of twenty terrestrial empires and of one spiritual empire, that is Muhammad. As regards all standards by which human greatness may be measured, we may well ask, is there any man greater than he?” Lamartine, in the book “Histoire de la Turquie”
– “It is impossible for anyone who studies the life and character of the great Prophet of Arabia, who knows how he taught and how he lived, to feel anything but reverence for that mighty Prophet, one of the great messengers of the Supreme. And although in what I put to you I shall say many things which may be familiar to many, yet I myself feel whenever I re- read them, a new way of admiration, a new sense of reverence fo r that mighty Arabian teacher.” Annie Besant, in the book “The Life and Teachings of Muhammad”
– “His readiness to undergo persecutions for his beliefs, the high moral character of the men who believed in him and looked up to him as leader, and the greatness of his ultimate achievement -all argue his fundamental integrity. To suppose Muhammad an impostor raises more problems than it solves. Moreover, none of the great figures of history is so poorly appreciated in the West as Muhammad.” W. Montgomery Watt, in the book “Mohammad at Mecca”

So, we ask the reader to reflect on the following:

Is it logical to believe that Muhammad (Peace be upon him) who, until the age of forty and, as we mentioned earlier, was known to his people as al-Amin (the trustworthy) and who is still admired even by Western scholars for his honesty and integrity, all of a sudden began to write a book that is unmatched in literary merit and that has not be matched by legions of the Arab poets and orators of the highest caliber throughout history?

Is it reasonable to say that Muhammad (Peace be upon him), made a false claim and on that very falsehood trained thousands of individuals of outstanding character, integrity, and honesty who were able to establish the best human society that the world has ever known?

_________________

Source: Taken from the book  entitled “Who Wrote the Qur’an?”

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Why did Muhammad Marry Several Women?

Why did Muhammad Marry Several Women?

By: Ibrahim H. Malabari

Prophet Muhammad's Several Wives

The Qur’an was attempting to give women such legal status that most Western women would not enjoy until the nineteenth century.

Whenever Prophet Muhammad’s name emerges, the image in many people’s minds is a man with many wives. For Muslims, his multiple marriages had a meaning and immense implications for Islam, and by extension, the history of the world. Needless to say, the issue remains controversial, and as such, any study of the matter requires an objective approach. Therefore, we will endeavor to tackle this topic by being as objective as possible.

Prophet Muhammad was driven by the goal to ensure that his mission as the Messenger of God was fulfilled and to establish a society based on God’s commands, and not his own. In order to achieve this goal, he did everything that was humanly possible: he forged relations with the various tribes of Arabia, concluded peace treaties with his sworn enemies and kept relations with the heads of various tribes, nations and religions.

Taken together, his marriages were one way by which he fostered relationships with various influential tribes. If one were to view the marriages of the Prophet from this context, the motivating factors behind his marriages become clear. It would be very simplistic and incorrect to view his marriages as being merely for lustful ends. Let us now briefly examine the context of each of his marriages to see whether this was the case.

From the outset, it is of ultimate importance to note that, except for only one of his wives, all of his eleven wives were widowed or divorced. Most were in fact widowed.

His first marriage was to a widow named Khadijah, who had been married twice and whom he married when she was forty years old and he was twenty five. She was the first woman to embrace Islam. She provided great consolation to him throughout his life and he continued to remember her in his later years as his most beloved wife. He stayed with her faithfully for 25 years until her death, at which time he was 50 years old, and she was 65 years old.

If he was driven by lustful desires as accused by his opponents, he could have married several, beautiful young women in a society where having numerous wives was a norm – there would be no reason to faithfully remain with an older woman until the age of 50. This single fact would be sufficient to totally refute the charges against him in this regard. However, an examination of all of his marriages, as we shall see, should put this question to rest.

After Khadija’s death, he married another widow, Sawda, who was 65 years old. She and her previous husband, Sakran, were among those who had immigrated to Ethiopia, fleeing from the oppression and persecution of the Meccans. It was during their return to Mecca that her husband had died. Seeing her difficult condition, the Prophet (peace be upon him) married her.

Then, he married `A’ishah, daughter of his lifelong friend and companion Abu Bakr. `A’ishah had first been betrothed to Jabir bin Mut`im at the age of 5. Child marriages were evidently the norm at that time. She was the only virgin among the Prophet’s wives and the only one who was born into a Muslim family. One of the Prophet’s goals in this marriage was to strengthen the bond of his brotherhood with Abu Bakr, who was his main defender against the Meccans. Second, `A’ishah was of a lineage known for honor and intelligence. The Prophet knew that she would tremendously benefit his nation (ummah) by transmitting crucial knowledge from his life, especially family and personal matters that others were not privy to.

Indeed, the Prophet advised his community to learn half of the knowledge of the religion from `A’ishah. The foresight of the Prophet proved itself, for she would live for 45 years after his death, and thus became one of the main sources of Prophetic wisdom and knowledge.

He also married another widow, Hafsa, who was the daughter of `Umar Bin Khattab, his next closest companion. Her husband, Khunays, had been martyred in the Battle of Badr. He felt a duty towards `Umar, whose acceptance of Islam provided a major boost for the Muslims in Mecca against their foes.

Zaynab, daughter of Khuzaima, was another widow that the Prophet married. She was married to `Ubayda bin Al-Haris, who was martyred in the Battle of Badr. She was sixty when the Prophet married her. She was known as the “Mother of the Downtrodden”. She, however, passed away after two or three months of marriage.

He married another widow, Umm Salama. Her previous husband, Abu Salama, was martyred in the Battle of Uhud, leaving behind four orphans. Umm Salama was pregnant at that time and was extremely distressed and very sad. Needless to say, she needed much support. After her delivery, `Umar proposed that the Prophet marry her. The Prophet accepted the proposal and married her.

What purpose can there be for a person of 54 to marry a widow with four orphans except love, mercy and compassion? There was another crucial factor in this marriage: Umm Salama was from the Bani Makhzum tribe, which was the tribe of Islam’s arch enemies at that time, Abu Jahl and Khalid bin Walid. Though Abu Jahl never changed, Khalid later accepted Islam and became a brilliant military general. Once again, bringing influential and powerful tribes closer to Islam was one of the noble objectives of the Prophet’s marriages.

He married a divorced woman, Zaynab, the daughter of Jahsh. She was married to Zayd bin Haritha, the freed slave of the Prophet. She was the cousin of the Prophet, being the daughter of his paternal aunt. Zayd divorced her and the Prophet married her when she was 38 years old. His marriage to Zaynab was aimed at emphasizing the invalidity of the age-old Arab practice of taking adopted sons as real sons. The marriage was divinely sanctioned, as stated in the Qur’an,

So when Zayd had no longer any need for her, We married her to you in order that there not be upon the believers any discomfort concerning the wives of their adopted sons when they no longer have need of them. (Al-Ahzab 33:37)

Umm Habiba was another widow whom the Prophet married. She was a daughter of Abu Sufyan who was a bitter enemy of Islam until his conversion later. She was initially married to `Ubaydullah, who was a companion of the Prophet. Both immigrated to Ethiopia, fleeing the persecution of the Meccans. `Ubaydullah became a Christian and later died there. Considering her very difficult situation, her father being an enemy of Islam and her husband a deserter, the Prophet sent an envoy to Negus, king of Ethiopia requesting to arrange a marriage with her. The king arranged the marriage and she was married to him when she was 36 or 37 years old. Like many of his marriages, his marriage to Umm Habiba resulted in bringing a major tribe of the Quraysh, Banu Abd al-Shams, towards Islam.

He married another widow, Juwayria. Both her father and husband were bitter enemies of Islam; the former had planned to attack Medina at the instigation of the Meccans. This led the Muslim army to march against the clan of her father. The result was their defeat at the hands of the Prophet and the death of Juwayria’s husband. After the conflict, the Muslims captured many prisoners, one of whom was Juwayria. Juwayria’s father offered a ransom for her freedom. She requested to stay in the service of the Prophet and he married her at her request. Her marriage resulted in the freeing of all the prisoners of war of her tribe. Again, this marriage led to the establishment of peace and friendly relations.

He also married a woman named Safiyya, a widow as well. Her second husband was killed in the Battle of Khaybar. Her father was the chief of the famous Jewish tribe, Banu Nazir. He was killed in the Battle of Khaybar, and so Safiyya was taken prisoner. She was eventually freed and the Prophet married her. Some complained that she was sympathetic to the Jews. Her answer was that they were her relatives, and the Prophet defended her position. He told her to respond in the following way: “My father is Aaron (Haron) and my uncle is Moses (Musa).” This marriage had led to a closer relationship between the Muslims and the Jews of Medina.

His final marriage was to another divorced woman, Maymuna. She was married twice and was very old. She married the Prophet when he was 57. The reason for her marriage was that the Prophet’s uncle, `Abbas, suggested it in order to bring her tribe –Hilaliyyin– to the fold of Islam. That was actually what happened; after his marriage to her, they entered Islam in hosts.

From the above, we see that it was not the Prophet’s whims and desires that initiated his marriages, but rather it was that God had planned his marriages. He commanded His Messenger after the last marriage (with Maymuna) not to marry any more (Qur’an 33:52), because by that time the objectives of his marriages were achieved as the Prophetic mission was near to completion.

All of this does not mean that the Prophet was not interested in sex. He was surely attracted by sex and beauty, and was not a prude in expressing it. He said, “Perfume and women are made dear to me. However, the joy of my eye is in prayer.” He also said: “I am in full control of myself.” In fact, a look at his life would suggest that he approached the various aspects of human life with moderation – be it eating, drinking, or enjoying time with his wives – never indulging in any one thing excessively. The portrayal of him by many Western writers as promiscuous and licentious, mostly due to the fact that he had numerous wives, is far from the truth and historical facts as shown above. Indeed, his marriages had a social motive and a higher goal than mere sexual gratification.

It would be relevant here to quote a female, Western scholar, Karen Armstrong, the author of Muhammad: A Prophet for Our Time, in relation to the issue of Prophet’s marriages and polygamy in Islam:

“The Qur’anic institution of polygamy was a piece of social legislation. It was designed not to gratify the male sexual appetite, but to correct the injustices done to widows, orphans, and other female dependents, who were especially vulnerable. All too often, unscrupulous people seized everything and left the weaker members of the family with nothing… Polygamy was designed to ensure that unprotected women would be decently married, and to abolish the old loose, irresponsible liaisons; men could have only four wives and must treat them equitably; it was an unjustifiably wicked act to devour their property… The Qur’an was attempting to give women a legal status that most Western women would not enjoy until the nineteenth century. The emancipation of women was a project dear to the Prophet’s heart…”

Source: Taken from the book “Ten Questions and Answers about Prophet Muhammad” by Ibrahim H. Malabari

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How did Prophet Muhammad React to Personal Abuse?

How did Prophet Muhammad React to Personal Abuse?

By Editorial Staff

Do you believe in Prophet Muhammad? If not, Why? Do you not agree that a person may be rightly judged by his/her reactions especially to personal abuse? What if such reactions are always great?

Just give yourself the chance to know Prophet Muhammad well before deciding to believe or disbelieve in him. Review this post to know how great Prophet Muhammad and how great his reactions were. You will see that his reactions were always prophetic even when he was deeply offended and personally abused. His manners were always those of a prophet even when insulted.

Feel free to interact with us through our Chat service, “Contact Us” page or “Revert to Islam” page or by commenting on the post. We welcome your feedback and look forward to addressing whatever concerns, inquiries, questions or views you may want to share with us.

How did Prophet Muhammad React to Personal Abuse?

How did Prophet Muhammad React to Personal Abuse? (Part I)

Prophet Muhammad forgave Suhayl ibn `Amr and pardoned Safwan ibn Umayyah and gave him a generous grant …

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How did Prophet Muhammad React to Personal Abuse? (Part II)

How did Prophet Muhammad React to Personal Abuse? (Part II)

Prophet Muhammad forgave `Umayr ibn Wahb, Abu Sufyan ibn Al-Harith and `Amr ibn Al-`Aas who all used to either satirize him or wished to kill him.

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How did Prophet Muhammad React to Personal Abuse? (Part III)

How did Prophet Muhammad React to Personal Abuse? (Part III)

Prophet Muhammad forgave `Urwah who talked to him impolitely and stretched his hand out towards his beard and `Abdullah ibn Abi Al-Sarh who accused him of fabrication …

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How did Prophet Muhammad React to Personal Abuse? (Part IV)

How did Prophet Muhammad React to Personal Abuse? (Part IV)

Prophet Muhammad refused to defer to the advice of some of his Companions who believed that the polytheistic captives of Mecca should have been beheaded …

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How did Prophet Muhammad React to Personal Abuse? (Part V)

How did Prophet Muhammad React to Personal Abuse? (Part V)

Prophet Muhammad agreed to adjourn his minor pilgrimage and return to Medina in order to avoid fighting against Quraysh and any likely bloodshed …

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How did Prophet Muhammad React to Personal Abuse? (Part VI)

How did Prophet Muhammad React to Personal Abuse? (Part VI)

Prophet Muhammad forgave and released the captives of Hawazin and Thaqif and refused to continue his siege to the forts of Al-Taif to avoid annihilating its people …

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How did Prophet Muhammad React to Personal Abuse? (Part VII)

How did Prophet Muhammad React to Personal Abuse? (Part VII)

Prophet Muhammad not only forgave but also supplicated and sought forgiveness for Shaybah ibn `Uthman though the latter was going to assassinate him …

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How did Prophet Muhammad React to Personal Abuse? (Part VIII)

How did Prophet Muhammad React to Personal Abuse? (Part VIII)

Prophet Muhammad tolerated `Uyaynah ibn Hisn’s abuse and betrayal and refused to kill him though he was such a hypocrite who did not really convert to Islam ..

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How did Prophet Muhammad React to Personal Abuse? (Part IX)

How did Prophet Muhammad React to Personal Abuse? (Part IX)

Prophet Muhammad was tolerant towards murderers, mutilators, satirical poets, harsh Bedouins, and double-faced hypocrites …

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How did Prophet Muhammad React to Personal Abuse? (Part X)

How did Prophet Muhammad React to Personal Abuse? (Part X)

Prophet Muhammad tried to avoid bloodshed as far as possible upon the Conquest of Mecca though its people drove him out and conspired to assassinate him …

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