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Speaking Truth To Oppression: Shireen Abu Akleh

Speaking Truth To Oppression: Shireen Abu Akleh

The Israeli assassination of Shireen Abu Akleh is yet another example of Zionist oppression against Palestinians, especially those who speak truth to power and resist their illegal occupation. Muslims and supporters of Palestine around the world can draw inspiration from her incredible work.

The Israeli #assassination of #ShireenAbuAkleh is yet another example of #ZionistOppression against Palestinians, especially those who speak truth to power and resist their illegal occupation. Muslims can draw inspiration from her incredible work.Click To Tweet

A Palestinian Icon

Shireen Abu Akleh was born on May 3, 1971, in Jerusalem. Her family were Catholic Arab Palestinian Christians from the holy city of Bethlehem. In an interview shortly before her death, she described herself as a “product of Jerusalem.” 

When Shireen’s mother migrated to New Jersey, Shireen obtained U.S. citizenship during the 70’s and 80’s. She spent time in the US when she was younger and often visited America during the summer months. Shireen herself grew up in Jerusalem where she graduated from the Catholic Rosary Sisters’ High School before moving to Amman, Jordan for university.

She initially studied architecture at the University of Science and Technology before switching to study journalism at Yarmouk University. When she returned to Palestine she worked with a variety of agencies including UNRWA and the Voice of Palestine radio station. She later joined Al Jazeera in 1997 and quickly became a household name as she covered the second Palestinian intifada from 2000-2005. Journalist Muhammad Daraghmeh, a close friend of hers who teaches at Birzeit University in the West Bank, said Abu Akleh was “one of the strongest journalists in the Arab world.” 

Brutal Assassination

Early Wednesday morning, according to Al Jazeera, Shireen was reporting on the Israeli military raid of the Jenin refugee camp with three other journalists. Her last correspondence sent to her colleagues at Al Jazeera was “There’s a raid in Jenin. We are heading there now. We will let you know.”

Shatha Hanaysha, one of the four total journalists who went to report on the scene, said, “We were going to film the Israeli army operation and suddenly they shot us without asking us to leave or stop filming.”  

Abu Akleh was shot in the face. She was rushed to a hospital in Jenin in critical condition, where she was declared dead shortly after, according to the Palestinian health ministry. She was murdered in cold blood, in her press vest, by the Israeli Occupation Forces.

#ShireenAbuAkleh was shot in the face. Israeli Occupation Forcers murdered her in cold blood while she was in her press vest. #IDF #Israel #Zionism #Zionist #AntiZionist #Occupation #Palestine #FreePalestineClick To Tweet

Standing Firm Against Oppression

In the Quran, Allah subḥānahu wa ta'āla (glorified and exalted be He) reveals in Surat al-Nisa:

 “O you who have believed, be persistently standing firm in justice, witnesses for Allāh, even if it be against yourselves or parents and relatives. Whether one is rich or poor, Allāh is more worthy of both. So follow not [personal] inclination, lest you not be just. And if you distort [your testimony] or refuse [to give it], then indeed Allāh is ever, of what you do, Aware.” [4:135]

Allah subḥānahu wa ta'āla (glorified and exalted be He) commands believers to stand firm in justice — to be grounded in truth, bear witness honestly, and to maintain a position of justness even against ourselves and our loved ones. 

To live in Palestine under occupation, with the most powerful countries and entities funding the destruction and colonization of your homeland, is an extremely difficult feat in itself. Shireen survived that unimaginable difficulty, and even risked her life to report the truth to the world. She bore witness to and reported on the horrific and continuous operation of the colonization of Palestine and the Palestinian resistance. Shireen’s purpose as a bearer of truth, even in the face of oppression and injustice, was beautifully manifested in the global success she had as a journalist, and the stellar reputation she had amongst her similarly-aligned colleagues. 

#ShireenAbuAkleh risked her life to report the truth about #IsraeliOccupation to the world. She bore witness to and reported on the horrific and continuous operation of the colonization of #Palestine and the Palestinian resistance. #FreePalestine #IsraelClick To Tweet

An Example to All

I heard the Messenger of Allah ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him) say, “Whosoever of you sees an evil, let him change it with his hand; and if he is not able to do so, then [let him change it] with his tongue; and if he is not able to do so, then with his heart — and that is the weakest of faith.” [Muslim]

Shireen grew up in occupied Palestine and witnessed evil on a daily basis. In her pursuit of a journalism education and exceptional career, she used her tongue to speak out against the injustices she reported on. 

She used her hand to do so as well in the production and execution of those reports with her fellow journalists and Al Jazeera team. And in the words of Israeli Military Spokesperson Ran Kochav, she worked against injustice by being “armed with cameras.” 

Shireen left a deep impression on the world with the ways in which she spoke out and actively worked against injustice. Her life story serves as an inspiration to women, men, and children around the world in pursuit of a meaningful life and a purpose around Palestine. Shireen Abu Akleh will  always will be remembered as an icon to the Palestinian liberation movement, and her words and actions, grounded in justice and truth, will forever be archived in history.

 

Related reading:

Palestine in the Islamic Consciousness 

The post Speaking Truth To Oppression: Shireen Abu Akleh appeared first on MuslimMatters.org.

Source: Muslim Matters

Freedom Of Speech And Protest In Islam: The Distorted Saudi View

Freedom Of Speech And Protest In Islam: The Distorted Saudi View

A Protest in the Prophet’s Mosque

A powerful event of peaceful protest happened two weeks ago (April 28) in Saudi Arabia at the Prophet’s ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him) mosque – something not seen in Medina for over fourteen hundred years. A visiting delegation of Pakistani politicians, including Prime Minister Shahbaz Sharif and two Ministers from the recently installed government, were greeted by repeated chants by worshippers of “chor,” which in English translates as “thief”. Did Prime Minister Sharif, who is out on bail on multiple criminal charges for alleged financial improprieties, visit the holy places to burnish his religious bona fides to a citizenry back home? If that was the case, the optics of what happened has had the opposite effect. The images of the protest have been relayed and amplified with commentary and gone viral on social media. For adherents of the Islamic faith, being called a “thief” near the resting place of the Prophet Muhammad ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him) is a profound jolt. It has been interpreted by many as signifying that these politicians were not worthy of traversing such sacred terrain.

Pakistan Prime Minister Shahbaz Sharif visits Prophet’s Mosque in the holy city of Madinah, Saudi Arabia. – (AP via Khaleej Times}

As was expected, the Saudi authorities who brook no dissent are incensed by the protests. Politically, one can understand the Saudi’s concern. Protests of “chor” against Pakistani officials if left unchecked could blossom to protests against Saudi governance or human rights violations. The Medina police have since arrested five suspects for “abusing and insulting” the Pakistani Ministers. The spokesperson for the police remarked the actions of the protesters is against Islam and “contradict the sanctity of the place.”  The protest took place a distance from the Prophet’s ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him) grave. Islamic scholars, all the way back to the Caliph Omar raḍyAllāhu 'anhu (may Allāh be pleased with him) and the Prophet’s ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him) wife Ayesha raḍyAllāhu 'anha (may Allāh be pleased with her) instructed Muslims not to raise one’s voice next to the Prophet’s ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him) grave. Understandably, political discourse and protests in the mosque even far from the grave of the Prophet ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him) would undermine the worship of other pilgrims. Given the crowds, time, manner, and place restrictions on protest is needed. But the notion that no protests are permitted in Islam or that political discourse never took place in the Prophet’s ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him) mosque is incorrect. The efforts of smart phones and citizen reporting of the incident offers a monumental teaching teachable moment for Muslims and others about the correct Islamic conception of democracy, freedom of speech and accountability of government officials for malfeasance.

Saudi and “Freedom” of Speech

There is a litany of prophetic examples that illustrate the Saudi view of freedom of speech and protest, like so much of their brand of Islam, is the antithesis of Islamic scriptures and prophetic practice. Islamic scriptures is replete with calls on every Muslim to enjoin good and forbid wrong. Muslims unanimously agree that the Prophet ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him) proclaimed that speaking against an unjust ruler is the highest form of sacrifice in the path of God. Muslims also unanimously concur that the Prophet ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him) said when you see a wrong, change it with your hand. If you cannot change it with your hand, then speak against the wrong. And if you cannot change the wrong with your words, then despise that wrong in your heart but that is the lowest level of faith.

There are many examples of freedom of speech and protest in the Prophet’s ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him) mosque, or during the pilgrimage during the life of the Prophet ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him) and the four immediate successors of the Prophet ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him), who Sunni Islam unanimously proclaims as the four noble or rightly guided Caliphs. The latter’s instructions and examples represent sources of Islamic law. Here are a few illustrations.

The Prophet ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him) was once delivering a speech and a man interrupted the Prophet ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him) and inquired about the unlawful detention of his neighbor. The man rose two more times and asked the same question. Thereafter, the Prophet ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him) asked the police officer to release the man’s neighbor. The incident is instructive at several levels. First, it occurred in the Prophet’s ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him) mosque. Second, it was the Prophet ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him) that was being interrupted. Third, the Prophet ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him) did not say that the interruption  disrespected him or his mosque. Fourth, the Prophet ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him) recognized the validity of someone concerned about injustice and raising the concern publicly.

On assuming office after he was selected leader of the state after the Prophet’s ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him) death, Abu Bakr raḍyAllāhu 'anhu (may Allāh be pleased with him), the first noble Caliph, addressed the community and remarked, “You have made me your leader, although I am in no way superior to you. Co-operate with me when I do right; correct me when I err.” He also said, “Turn away from me when I deviate.” Abu Bakr raḍyAllāhu 'anhu (may Allāh be pleased with him) admonished the community that if he errs and departs from ethical principles, which by definition preclude corruption, immorality, and injustice, the community has an obligation to speak truth to power.

Meanwhile, Saudi Crown Prince Mohamed Bin Sultan recently asked the Saudi population to accept austerity measures whilst personally spending about half a billion United States dollars on a supposed Salvador Mundi painting of Christ, which turned out to be a fake. Islamic tenets demand that the public must hold leaders accountable for their actions. Caliph Abu Bakr raḍyAllāhu 'anhu (may Allāh be pleased with him) stated, “[T]o tell the truth to a person commissioned to rule is faithful allegiance; to conceal it is treason.”

Dynasty vs Khilaafah

Abu Bakr raḍyAllāhu 'anhu (may Allāh be pleased with him) recognized the equality of society, which is replete in the sayings of the Prophet ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him). The legitimacy of Abu Bakr’s raḍyAllāhu 'anhu (may Allāh be pleased with him) leadership was not derived from dynastic rule. The subsequent three Caliphs were also selected  through a process of mutual consultation, which arguably represented the first implementation of a rudimentary democracy; rule by consensus as opposed to coercion. It was also a rejection of hereditary leadership. On his deathbed, the second Caliph, Omar raḍyAllāhu 'anhu (may Allāh be pleased with him), asked for a consultative committee of the leading personalities of the time to choose his successor. Omar raḍyAllāhu 'anhu (may Allāh be pleased with him) was absolutely emphatic that his successor could not be his son, thus eschewing dynastic rule.

Neither the Prophet ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him) (considered by Muslims as the greatest personality that lived), nor the Caliphs gave the state their family name. The Saudi state is named after the ruling family and constitutes an absolutist, dynastic, and family-centered government, the members of whom have amassed enormous wealth. The Royal family treat the resources and treasury as their private piggy bank. Caliph Abu Bakr raḍyAllāhu 'anhu (may Allāh be pleased with him) warned his officials against making state appointments based on nepotism or leaders enriching themselves. On assuming the office of Caliph, Abu Bakr raḍyAllāhu 'anhu (may Allāh be pleased with him) asked his daughter to take stock of his assets so that a determination can be made at the end whether he had been enriched in office. This might be the earliest recorded instance of a leader concerned about corruption and providing a self-imposed check against corruption.

Limits to Obedience

Like his predecessor, the second Caliph, Omar raḍyAllāhu 'anhu (may Allāh be pleased with him), instructed the Muslim community that no leader should be obeyed if he acts against the tenets of the faith. Omar raḍyAllāhu 'anhu (may Allāh be pleased with him) remarked that the community has rights over him and must be able to enforce those rights. Omar raḍyAllāhu 'anhu (may Allāh be pleased with him) took meticulous measures to ensure that political power was not an entrée to richness. For example, Omar raḍyAllāhu 'anhu (may Allāh be pleased with him) asked every officer he appointed to take a pledge that they would live simply and eat simply. Those that breached the rule were reported by the citizenry and were sanctioned. A detailed inventory of the assets of the officials was prepared at the time of their appointment and reassessed at the end of their tenure. The officials had to account for any increases in their assets.

The Saudi monarchy and the sycophant clerics on the government payroll distort material aspects of Islam to justify and fortify the survival of the Al Saud dynasty. They demand absolute obedience to a ruler. This is an inversion of Islamic teachings and contradict historical examples concerning issues of justice, morality, and corruption being addressed in the Prophet’s ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him) mosque or during the pilgrimage.

The Caliph Omar raḍyAllāhu 'anhu (may Allāh be pleased with him) was confronted in public in the Prophet’s ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him) mosque and in the streets by ordinary people who raised concerns about inappropriate behavior by government officials. Omar raḍyAllāhu 'anhu (may Allāh be pleased with him) protected the right of a person that once interrupted his speech, and is reported to have said “if the people do not give me good advice they are useless and if I do not listen to it, I am useless.” On another occasion, Omar raḍyAllāhu 'anhu (may Allāh be pleased with him) asked the assembly what would they do if he, Omar raḍyAllāhu 'anhu (may Allāh be pleased with him), strayed from the straight path? A man stood up and responded he would confront Omar raḍyAllāhu 'anhu (may Allāh be pleased with him) and even suggested he would take up arms against him. Omar raḍyAllāhu 'anhu (may Allāh be pleased with him) replied, “praise be to God that among my people are present men who could put me on the straight part if I deviated from it.”

A Distortion of Islam

The Saudis demand the pilgrimage and visits to the holy mosques be conducted as an exclusive exercise of rituals and individual spirituality – a reflection and strengthening of the individual’s relationship with God in a morally blind manner. The Prophet ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him) and the Caliphs conducted political and military meetings in the Prophet’s ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him) mosque. The Caliphs Omar raḍyAllāhu 'anhu (may Allāh be pleased with him) and Uthman raḍyAllāhu 'anhu (may Allāh be pleased with him)  required their senior government officials come to Mecca at the time of the annual pilgrimage and people were encouraged  to voice any complaints they might have had against any official. Omar raḍyAllāhu 'anhu (may Allāh be pleased with him) is known to have taken action against aberrant government officials during these occasions.

The Saudi rulers distort the comprehensive Islamic injunction of enjoining good and forbidding evil, and turn it on its head to preclude any questioning of their rule. In doing so, they offer an obtuse and destructive assault on absolute principles of justice, ethics, morality, and good governance, which in Islam cannot be derogated from.

The protest in Medina in the last week of Ramadan did not happen next to the Prophet’s ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him) grave, which would be problematic. Not since the time of the noble Caliphs have we seen this sort of peaceful rebuke of public officials, albeit not Saudi, in the first Muslim capital. The protest offers Muslims an opportunity for self-reflection beyond the positivist diet fed by absolute dictators that they are owed unquestionable obedience by virtue of their hold on power. The Caliphs Abu Bakr raḍyAllāhu 'anhu (may Allāh be pleased with him) and Omar raḍyAllāhu 'anhu (may Allāh be pleased with him) rebuked an inert or indifferent citizenry, and ordered them to hold their leaders publicly accountable. The Prophet ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him) and the noble Caliphs would not countenance illegitimate or dynastic rule, profligacy, corruption, authoritarianism, human rights violations, the slaughter of civilians in Yemen, or Saudi support for repression in Egypt and Palestine. The obligation to enjoin good and forbid evil requires every Muslim to talk out against these abuses. The concept of Deen -that Islam is an all-encompassing way of life- requires the rejection of Saudi and other brands of Islam that pigeonhole Islam as sanitized rituals, devoid of moral, ethical and political dimensions.

 

Related reading:

Politics In Islam: Muslims Are Called To Pursue Justice

Podcast: Priorities and Protest | On Muslim Activism with Shaykhs Dawud Walid and Omar Suleiman

 

 

The post Freedom Of Speech And Protest In Islam: The Distorted Saudi View appeared first on MuslimMatters.org.

Source: Muslim Matters

Keeping That Emaan Game Strong Post Ramadan

Keeping That Emaan Game Strong Post Ramadan

After Ramadan, it’s a struggle to maintain that spiritual high! Ustadhah Faria provides 5 tips on keeping your emaan game strong after Ramadan.

Ramadan is one of the most beautiful times we experience in the year. There is a spiritual high in its true communal sense. However, soon after this month is over and we return to our daily life routines, many times we quickly lose the good practices we gained in this month. However, Allah ‘azza wa jall sent Ramadan as a beneficial gift to us through which we can attain a higher level of God-consciousness (taqwa) in our daily lives, to be continued even after Ramadan. Therefore, it is of great importance that we reflect on the ways we can maintain our taqwa in a sustainable manner even after Ramadan. In this article, I share 5 short tips that can help us maintain our taqwa after Ramadan has passed, inshaAllah.

1. Leaving sins 

One of the key ways to gain taqwa is through leaving sins. This is because sinning is an obstacle between the slave and Allah subḥānahu wa ta'āla (glorified and exalted be He). Sins make our hearts ill and it makes good deeds feel like a burden. The less sins a slave is involved in, the more he can enjoy doing good deeds and get closer to Allah subḥānahu wa ta'āla (glorified and exalted be He) The Prophet ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him) said:

“A person is certainly deprived of provisions because of a sin that afflicted them.” [Ibn Majah- Hasan]

And from the greatest of provisions is the closeness to Allah subḥānahu wa ta'āla (glorified and exalted be He) and feeling the sweetness of emaan in our hearts. Apart from losing other provisions, sins will rip us off this great provision of being close to Allah subḥānahu wa ta'āla (glorified and exalted be He). Therefore, one of the easiest ways of maintaining our taqwa even after Ramadan is to deliberately stay away from sins that we know we easily tend to fall into. It can be sins of the tongue like backbiting, sins of the body like missing prayers, or sins of the heart like constantly assuming bad of other people.

2. Dhikr 

Remembering Allah subḥānahu wa ta'āla (glorified and exalted be He) through the dhikr taught by the Prophet ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him) is one of the easiest and most effective ways of maintaining our taqwa. And rightfully so, as soon as Ramadan is over and the evening of Eid arrives, we are encouraged to say the takbeer aloud. It is such a great reminder for us that we bid farewell to Ramadan with the dhikr of Allah subḥānahu wa ta'āla (glorified and exalted be He) and come out of this month in His obedience, and not His disobedience.

Furthermore, the following hadith is one of the most relevant hadith for lay people like us who have a busy life and many responsibilities. Abdullah ibn Busr raḍyAllāhu 'anhu (may Allāh be pleased with him) narrated that one of the Prophet’s Companions said, “O Messenger of Allah. I am overwhelmed by the so many injunctions of Islam. So tell me something to which I may hold fast.” The Prophet ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him) replied,

“Keep your tongue wet with the remembrance of Allah.” [At Tirmidhi]

From the many adhkar we can do on a daily basis, sitting, walking, going to work and any other ordinary situation, this hadith shows one of the easiest ways to remember Allah subḥānahu wa ta'āla (glorified and exalted be He) that pleases Him:

Abu Hurairah narrated that the Prophet ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him) said: “There are two statements that are light on the tongue, heavy on the scales, and beloved to the Most Merciful: Subahana Allahi wa bihamdih, Subhana Allahi Al-`Azeem.” (Glory and praise be to Allah, Glorified is Allah, the Most Great) [Bukhari]

3. Fasting

It is no surprise that Allah subḥānahu wa ta'āla (glorified and exalted be He) has reserved tremendous rewards for fasting even after the month of Ramadan. Abu Ayyub raḍyAllāhu 'anhu (may Allāh be pleased with him) reported that the Messenger of Allah ṣallallāhu 'alayhi wa sallam (peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him) said:

“Whoever fasts Ramadan and follows it with six days of Shawwal , it will be as if he fasted for a lifetime.” [Narrated by Muslim, Abu Dawud, al-Tirmidhi, al-Nasai and Ibn Majah]

If we reflect on this, we can see that fasting has been chosen as one of the obligatory acts in the month of Ramadan to help us increase in taqwa. Following the month, Allah subḥānahu wa ta'āla (glorified and exalted be He) has also encouraged us to continue the practice of fasting even after Ramadan. Therefore, if possible, we can continue fasting regularly in the months outside Ramadan to help us maintain the beautiful taqwa we have been gifted in the month of Ramadan.

4. Continuing the small good deeds 

Abu Huraira reported: The Messenger of Allah, peace and blessings be upon him, said,

“Take up good deeds only as much as you are able, for the best deeds are those done regularly even if they are few.” [Sunan Ibn Mājah 4240]

It may have been that extra effort in Ramadan to pray a little more in your sujood, trying not speak ill of others even if they were on the wrong; whatever it was, try holding onto it. Our lives transform through these little habits we develop deliberately, and this is why taqwa is so crucial. It creates that heightened sense of awareness in us that helps us stay away from even the tiniest action that can make Allah subḥānahu wa ta'āla (glorified and exalted be He) displeased with us. So, whatever good habits we developed in the month of Ramadan, let us intentionally identify them, and try to hold onto them post Ramadan.

5. Reciting the Quran 

Have glad tidings! Verily, one end of this Quran is in the hand of Allah subḥānahu wa ta'āla (glorified and exalted be He) and another end is in your hands. Adhere to it, for then you will not be destroyed, and you will never go astray after it.” [Tabarani]

This hadith shows how beautifully the Quran connects us to Allah subḥānahu wa ta'āla (glorified and exalted be He). Allah subḥānahu wa ta'āla (glorified and exalted be He) will never leave His end, therefore if the connection with us loosens it, is us who have abandoned our end of the Quran. The month of Ramadan taught us that if we intentionally make some time for the Quran, it is very possible to hold on to it after. We do not have to read a lot, but even that one ayah that we read sincerely with all of our heart can make us from His beloved and help us attain His forgiveness. And what else do we need when we have Allah’s subḥānahu wa ta'āla (glorified and exalted be He) love and His mercy? Surely, He is enough for His slaves.

 

Ramadan comes and Ramadan goes. But it comes with a purpose. It comes to transform us. And the transformation will not sustain until we make a deliberate effort to maintain it on a more ordinary day outside of Ramadan. So I hope the above 5 tips helps us maintain that transformation, reach newer spiritual heights, and make us get closer and closer to our Rabb, Allah subḥānahu wa ta'āla (glorified and exalted be He).

 

Related reading:

Will You be a Better Person After Ramadan? | Yasir Qadhi

Maqasid (Wisdoms) of the Six Fasts of Shawwal

The post Keeping That Emaan Game Strong Post Ramadan appeared first on MuslimMatters.org.

Source: Muslim Matters

Podcast: A Critical Look At Islamic Pedagogy

What’s the best form of Islamic education for kids? Islamic school? Boarding school? Sunday school at the masjid? A traditional madrasah? And what role do parents play in all of this?

Shaykh AbdulRahman Chao, a teacher and education consultant, provides a critical look at Islamic pedagogy and discusses what a holistic Islamic education for children should include.

Abdul Rahman Chao is a Houston based community teacher and speaker. He is a graduate of the Islamic University of Madinah, has a Master’s of Theological Studies in Christian Studies, and is finishing his Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction. He has over 10 years of formal classroom teaching experience in both full time and weekend Islamic schools. You can find him on Facebook and Instagram, and check out his website.

 

Related reading:

Challenges of Identity & Conviction: The Need to Construct an Islamic Worldview

Islamic Pedagogy and Critical Thinking: Does Islamic Pedagogy Want Critical Thinkers?

The post Podcast: A Critical Look At Islamic Pedagogy appeared first on MuslimMatters.org.

Source: Muslim Matters

The Global Imams & Scholars’ Charter – The Global Imams & Scholars Network

The Global Imams & Scholars’ Charter – The Global Imams & Scholars Network

The Global Imams and Scholars Network, consisting of seven international scholarly councils, has developed a historic charter for Western Muslim leaders, outlining a general set of principles to be followed.

The British Board of Scholars & Imams (BBSI), Australian National Imams Council (ANIC), European Council of Imams, Canadian Council of Imams (CCI), North American Imams Federation (NAIF), United Ulama Council of South Africa, and Ulama Council of New Zealand have come together to collaborate on mutually beneficial work.

The Global Imams and Scholars Network aims to share knowledge and promote traditional and orthodox principles and the message of Islam and preserve the Islamic identity for Muslims living in the west.

The Global and Imams & Scholars’ Charter are general principles the network seeks to inculcate within their work and encourage other imams and scholars to adopt.

 

Download the PDF: Global Imams & Scholars Charter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Related Reading: Blurred Lines – Women, “Celebrity” Shaykhs, and Spiritual Abuse

The post The Global Imams & Scholars’ Charter – The Global Imams & Scholars Network appeared first on MuslimMatters.org.

Source: Muslim Matters